Karoo Soul Searching – Diary of a roadtripper 

Somewhere between a “Groot” River and a tiny dorpie called Vanwyksdorp, placed on the foothold of the Rooiberg Mountain Range lies a little olive farm called Blue Sky Organics. It’s here that I go to when I need to find solace for my soul and rejuvenation of my being. Beside the edging of the olive trees is a lone cottage with your name on it, there if you need to escape the magnitude of mankind.


Be prepared to hear nothing but the chirping of birds,  the call of the baboon troops, the creaking of the roof in the changing heat and the whispering of the wind.

The scenic afternoon route I planned took me via Mosselbay then a sharp right at the Herbertsdale turn off, aiming for the mountains as you head past farmlands and all while the landscape changes from soft coastal views to hard rocky outcrops. It converts to a Karoo type topography with sheep farming the predominant source of income as you head deeper into the hills.

The road switches to gravel just after Herbertsdale so be prepared for a dusty drive, but nowhere in my Karoo travels have I come across a more picturesque drive than this one. The wide curves in the road seem to compliment the panoramic sight as you almost swoop past the mountain and then dip into a river bed, rattle over a cattle grid just to get ready for the next surprise. 
It’s along one of these dips and swoops at a nearing sunset that I noticed the moon, bearing her fullness over the peaks of the mountain tops in the soft pink glow of the sinking sun. Even if time was ticking and I worked against the clock to get to my destination before sunset, I just couldn’t help myself and I grabbed the minute to stop, appreciate and capture the moment on camera.

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It’s when I encounter these little bits of delights in my life, that it actually becomes more meaningful. It wasn’t planned or forced, it just happened and nature paints her own pictures without the help of man. 
So my arrival was at the deep onset of dusk and a cheerful wave greeting from owner Liz to hurry me up the rocky driveway to the cottage with no name. Pooped I stumbled out of the car and distributed my luggage all over the stoep and cottage before taking in the moons display as night softly fell on God’s land.

The rest of the evening consisted of nibbling on nothing healthy and with a cold beer in hand while trying to find the pages of the book I’ve been trying to read for several months now. Not minding the time it takes to find my lost place in the untouched book, a whilst sitting under the outside light and feeling the warm air on my skin, I was just happy to be here.

The next morning, after spending the night on top of my bed with a book on my chest, I was woken up by the sunlight pouring its rays into my bedroom. I lazily stretched myself out like a cat and got up to make coffee.

The great thing about travelling on your own is that you can literally do anything you want, and grabbing my morning substance of the dark brew and my book, newly discovered, I nuzzled my way into the chair on the outside stoep and started the reading process all over again. It’s was only during the late morning when the worms in my stomach were protesting the lack of food and threatening a strike action that I decided to make a hearty brunch and still the lot.

It was way after 2 pm when my conscious saw the light and started nagging me for a walk. I dressed in some comfy kit, grabbed my floppy hat, walking sticks, camera, water bottle and headed for the kloof.

The walk starts at the cottage and works its way past the pale olive trees and stony fields of the hillside before hitting the riverbed of boulders in the kloof. For most of the hike, you will stone hop and balance on rocks, clamber and climb the pale gibber until deep into the kloof. It’s a slight challenge so the best thing to do is to be tenacious and surefooted and why rush?  The rising cliff faces are a dramatic sight and standing and just staring up for long lingering minutes are part of the process. Liz’s dog Jed “i” accompanied me on my lone expedition and the hearty companion was a welcoming addition to my walk and kept me entertained for the +- 2 hours I spent in the kloof, not without compensation of course. Dogs are like that?  They love to share and share the love. So nibbles were an inevitable part of the walk.

It was the late afternoon that I eventually stumbled out of the kloof and headed back up the road, the wind has picked up and was shaking everything around me. The tall blue gum next to my accommodation was rustling up a storm and it sounded like he was orchestrating the whole lot while a small out building’s roof was sounding like a symbol in an out of tune street band.

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After a brisk shower and some clean clothing, I decided on an early braai and pottered around the kitchen to gather some eats that may be considered healthy. A  light salad, blanched broccoli, few minute steaks and a cheesy toasty to scourge on the fire. It seemed pointless to make a fire for one,  not to even mention that it was for a few measly minute steaks, but for the ambience, it was worth it.

As the fire worked its way through the wood pile I sat back and indulged in the rest of my book and an ice cold beer in hand. Life’s Good

It wasn’t until much later that evening that I dragged myself off to bed after enjoying the company of the fictional characters in my novel. It was in a bright moonlit bedroom that I dozed off to dream the world.

When I opened my eyes the next morning the cloud base was hanging low over the valley, the promise of rain was in the air! The rain spider above my bed confirmed it, and even if I don’t like the fury creepy crawlies they are never wrong. I normally engage in a tap dance with theses eight-legged creatures but today I just decided to let it be, I have been living in the area for long enough to be used to them by now…..um maybe. 
It was a lazy start to the day and the idea of actually packing up and heading home was not exactly appealing. Reluctantly I packed the few things I threw in a bag for the weekend tossed it in the car, stared back at the view,  took one more deep breath and headed out to back roads of these red mountains and its sweet curves. The long awaited rain softly started falling and I watched mother earth sigh with relief as it welcomed the moisture. 

One more escape, one more journey, one more place to be discovered and explored this is what road trips are made for. This is my simple passion and I live it and love it. #HowzitSouthAfrica

Diary of a Road Tripper

Spending time on the road in South Africa is probably one of the most rewarding ways to travel. But head for the Garden Route and Klein Karoo, where the traffic is easily managed and the roads pretty open, and you will discover what it’s like to travel with ease. Here the hustle and bustle of the city does not exist, so open your window, breathe in the fresh air and drive.

There are a few routes here that are an absolute “must-do”, with en-route stop over’s, viewpoints and iconic sites to visit as you wend your way through the Southern Cape.

Looking back at the second chamber of the Cango Caves.

Karoo Bliss:
Head along the R 62 to Oudtshoorn, South Africa’s heartbeat of the Klein Karoo. Visit the splendid Cango Caves and stand in awe as you admire the  illuminated dark caverns. Get tickled by some ostrich interaction and indulge in a good old-fashioned “padstal” along the way. Then wind your way to Mosselbay via the R 328 Robinson Pass which is set in the curves of the Outeniqua Mountain Range. Stop at the summit of the pass and take in the spectacular view of these Mountains before winding your way down to the coast.

Looking down on the entrance to the Pinnacle Point Caves.

A Day in the Bay:

  1. Mosselbay the Point of Human Origin, is a place of seafarers, with history  entrenched in its very being. A trip to Pinnacle Point to explore the forgotten caves and experience 90 million-year-old ancestry is essential.  Head to town and explore the Diaz Museum to learn about ocean history, and then make your way to a harbour restaurant to treat yourself to some fresh fish. Adventure in the Garden Route starts here; find an interesting activity to do before leaving for George. Drive the R102 along the coast prior to joining the N2 to travel to the next coastal town, as many a whale has been spotted along this road.
The old train bridge over the Kaaiman’s River

Heading for Eden:
Wilderness. As you drive through the Kaaimans River Pass the Eden stretch of your journey starts, most probably the prettiest drive along the Garden Route as it has so much to offer. First, stop at Dolphins point; this overlooks the old train bridge and the mouth of the Kaaiman’s river, take in the scenery here and then head to the Touw River for a paddle and a short hike along the Kingfisher Trail to visit one of the most beautiful waterfalls in the area.

There is no shortage of restaurants in the region, but a stop at Timberlake village along the N2 is a real treat with a variety of places to eat and shop. The next spot to visit along the N2 is Gericke’s Point at Swartvlei Beach. Also known as the Sphinx of the Garden Route, this fossilised dune formation is quite a sight to see and lies half immersed in the ocean.

Sunset on Myoli Beach

This is the Sunset stretch of the coast so make sure you are prepared for a good sundowner experience at one of the many viewpoints,  recommended viewpoints are, Cloud 9 or Myoli Beach in Sedgefield, closer to Knysna there is Brenton on Sea or the Water Front. Whichever you choose, you will not be disappointed.

The view from the Knysna Heads

Knysna.

There are many different facets to this coastal town that originally became famous for its timber. Knysna is a combination of coast, farms and forest. Moulded into the foothold of the Outeniqua its beauty is unparalleled once you start exploring. Grab a map and visit the forest areas. Find one of the old trees and just stand and admire its majestic splendour. The oyster is another delight for which Knysna is famous, and can be found in many a restaurant in town. Then there is, of course, the view from the Heads of Knysna, an absolute must see. It is the portal of many a passing ship and one of the Garden Route’s’ iconic views.

The emerging bubbly and boutique wine estate route

Cruising to the Crags

Next stop, Plettenberg Bay and beyond. During your first visit to the area you definitely need to visit Robberg Nature Reserve and a morning hike along its sheer rock face and a beach swim should be on the cards. It is not a difficult walk and extremely scenic. Then off to The Crags for lunch at one of the budding boutique wine estates, where tapas and bubbly is highly recommended. There many soft adventure activities here and an afternoon exploring The Crags is an afternoon well spent.

End off your day by visiting Tsitsikamma Village, before journeying to your next destination.

The Hang Bridge over the Storms River mouth

You might want to try the crazy bungee jump off Storms River Bridge before leaving the Garden Route or if that is not your thing perhaps indulge in a canopy tour in the natural forest or a visit to Tsitsikamma Nature Reserve.

One thing is guaranteed, this will have been the trip of a lifetime!

“To rent a car with Around about Cars and explore this incredible region of South Africa click here: “Car Rental South Africa” 

Human on Planet Earth

I am very excited to share the following story with you. It is one of forgotten times, forgotten people, a time when the earth was a place to survive on, a time when people were faced with the raw elements and imminent change.
I was invited to spend a morning (and part of the afternoon) with Dr Peter Nilssen from the Point of Human Origins and step into their discovery of the Pinnacle point caves in Mosselbay, their archaeological finds, research and theories that have sprung from the interesting artifacts and stone found here. He, his colleague and the teams that have worked for years around the clock, in these crevices of earthly soil, to bring forth their finds in these series of 15 caves, each with its own unique shape, micro existence and geological development through the ages

It starts with his introduction to the human race and their mindset towards the planet they inhabit. The next hour or so I was completely captivated by his journey into the history of mother earth and her souls she so carefully selected to survive her growth. Of how we have become disconnected from our environment and if we can learn from our past while looking towards the future.

Peter has a very spiritual approach to his findings, a consciousness that is slowly returning to us here left on earth. It is clear that we have to relook our lives, how we live it and what we can carry over to our children. Stepping into these earth crevices with the knowledge of what has taken places here within the space of 30 – 90 million years leaves one in awe and respect of our ancestry.

As you descend towards the edge of the ocean, while looking up at the rock formations, you can not help wondering how the landscape was formed over this vast amount of time. Things we only dream to understand all while we scratch the surface of our planet. Peter talks about survival, tools, fire, food foraging and intellectual decisions made here by our stone-age descendants. You can’t help throwing yourself back in time and ponder of whether you would have survived this era.

In reality, we are only a small spec of dust, a tiny blue planet in the huge galaxy of stars and suns. In our tiny existence isn’t it time to put away our egos and look back to where we have come from and how we can harmonise with this beautiful body of energy and life.

As Peter states in Cave 13b “Welcome Home”  I urge you to take the time discover and maybe rediscover the primal heartbeat inside you. One of standing still and looking back to see exactly how far we have come.